ACT composite score highest in Olathe district history

Students in the Olathe School District scored a composite score of 24 on the ACT exam, the highest in the district’s history. The test was taken by 71 percent of 2015 graduates. The scores were well above state and national peers.

“As a district we could not be more proud of this outstanding accomplishment by our students,” Assistant Superintendent of Teaching and Learning Jessica Dain said. “This type of academic achievement opens many post-secondary educational opportunities and financial benefits to our students as they graduate from the Olathe Public Schools and enter the next phase of their educational careers. Scores like these are a direct result of our district teachers, administrators, and curricular specialists collaborating together with a strategic focus on curricular alignment and college and career preparedness. Today we celebrate!”

The four tests of the ACT Assessment measure academic areas traditionally identified with college preparatory high school programs: math, English, reading and science reasoning. ACT test scores are reported on a scale of 1 to 36.

The ACT is universally accepted for college admission and includes an interest inventory that provides information for career and educational planning. Many students take the ACT as a junior and again as a senior.

Earlier this month, the district announced three current students who have received perfect scores of 36 on the ACT. They are Ty Lawson from Olathe North High School; and Weston Harder and Connor Neil from Olathe Northwest High School.

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